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Quiz: Name every player to have scored 25 in a top European league season since 2010

With Germany's Bundesliga having resumed after the coronavirus lockdown, the race for the European Golden Shoe is back on.

The French season has been declared over but football is set to return in England, Italy and Spain later this month.

Three men have already reached 25 goals in Europe's top five leagues this season but can you name every player to have done so in the past 10 years?

There are 32 names to get and you've got 10 minutes...

Can you name every player to have scored at least 25 goals in a season in Europe’s top five leagues from the last 10 years?

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This news item was provided by the BBC Sport - Football website - the original link is: http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/52913929

England 2-0 Scotland: What was it like to be on the receiving end of Gazza’s genius?

Euro 96: Gazza's sublime strike

The flick, the finish, and the celebration that followed have made it one of the most famous goals in English football history - but it only sews sorrow in Scottish hearts.

Paul Gascoigne's spectacular strike, and the sight of his team-mates sprinting to squirt water down his throat, is remembered fondly by England fans for far more than just being the moment that kickstarted Euro 96 for the hosts.

For the side on the receiving end of Gazza's genius, however, it simply sealed a 2-0 defeat at the hands of their fiercest rivals that is still hard to swallow, 24 years on.

Here, then-Scotland boss Craig Brown and midfielder Stuart McCall explain why the day could have turned out very differently - especially for Gascoigne, who was about to be substituted when he scored.

The game is being shown in full on BBC One and the BBC Sport website (along with text commentary) at 13:15 BST on Saturday to kick-off the BBC's Euros Rewind series.

On Saturday, the BBC will also celebrate Gascoigne's unique talent with "Gazza Day", looking back at his eventful career.

Drunken disgraces - and sober sensations

England had come into the competition under a cloud after some of their players were pictured drinking heavily during a pre-tournament trip to Hong Kong - including in a nightclub with the infamous dentist's chair drinking game, which Gazza mimicked when he celebrated his goal against Scotland

Brown: England were in disgrace for what had happened. We were over in New York at that time and about to fly back. I said to the players that there was not going to be a single drop of drink on that flight, and told them they were not going to be slobbing about in their tracksuits either.

I was really proud of them as we got off the flight, they were immaculate. They all had their blazers and ties on; the ties were right up, not hanging down.

I've never seen so many members of the press at Gatwick waiting on this drunken Scottish team coming off the flight. I'll never forget Ally McCoist running up to me and saying "I can see the headline tomorrow - 'Scots in sober sensation'".

The Auld Enemy awaits at Wembley

Scotland's fans had seen them hold a much-fancied Dutch team to a 0-0 draw in their opening game in Group A, and headed to Wembley in huge numbers for an away side

McCall: As much as the majority of supporters were English, we had about 10,000 fans there so it wasn't particularly intimidating - it was a fantastic atmosphere and a great game to look forward to.

McCall: There were a few head-to-heads with club team-mates facing off. Colin Hendry and Alan Shearer at Blackburn, Colin Calderwood and Teddy Sheringham at Spurs, and myself and Gazza at Rangers. That was intriguing.

Gascoigne had scored 19 goals for Rangers in the 1995-96 season

Brown: I told Colin to phone Shearer and find out how many complimentary tickets the England players were getting. I wanted our players to feel at least, or more, important than the opposition. Say they got six tickets, I made sure our players got eight. It's good psychologically for a game of that magnitude.

Scotland's plan comes together

England line up in a 3-1-1-3-2 formation, with Stuart Pearce and Gary Neville either side of Tony Adams and Gareth Southgate just in front of them, joining Gascoigne and Paul Ince in the centre of midfield

McCall: Going to Wembley, I'm not saying there was an overconfidence but given England had started off with a disappointing draw against Switzerland, the pressure was all on them. You go away from home and you try to keep the crowd quiet, try to keep it tight early on and that was the game-plan at the start.

Scotland also lined up with three at the back, with Tom Boyd, Colin Hendry and Colin Calderwood at the back. McCall joined Gary McAllister and John Collins in the centre of their midfield

McCall: The game was a bit of a non-event, which suited us. I don't think England had an attempt at goal in the first half. When the whistle went for the break, there were a couple of boos from the crowd.

So you can imagine my surprise as I'm walking down the tunnel and I hear the sound of studs rushing on the concrete from behind me. I turn around and thought there would be a bit of trouble but it was Gazza. He took his shirt off and gave it to me and said "here, that's for your daughter".

I'd been on TV the night before and said that my daughter was a big fan of his because of his role at Rangers. I'd never ask for his shirt or anything - I wasn't into that. But for him to do that, it says it all about his generosity and thoughtfulness. I put it in my bag and didn't say anything to anyone.

Gazza is panned...

The BBC pundits pile into Gascoigne at half-time, with Jimmy Hill saying "he doesn't look physically right, he doesn't look emotionally right. Without him, the England team suffers". Alan Hansen, meanwhile, sings Scotland's praises, adding: "They have done really well. The only thing that was missing was a goal."

Pearce is pulled...

There are no changes for Scotland at the break but England boss Terry Venables brings on Jamie Redknapp for Stuart Pearce. Southgate drops into the back three. Redknapp slots into midfield and Steve McManaman and Darren Anderton switch flanks

... and Shearer scores

The changes have the desired effect for Venables, as his team take control. On 53 minutes, McManaman feeds the overlapping Gary Neville and he picks out Alan Shearer to head home at the far post

McCall: For 15 minutes, they got right on top and the crowd got behind them. We didn't get to grips with what was happening. Once the goal went in, we got back in the game. David Seaman made a fantastic save from Gordon Durie.

Penalty! Salvation for Scotland?

Scotland continue to press for an equaliser and, with 13 minutes to go, Durie beats a sliding Tony Adams to a McCall cross and Italian referee Pierluigi Pairetto points to the spot

McCall: When we got our penalty, we were back in it. I think England had got edgy because of what had happened in the Switzerland game after they went 1-0 up. I was always confident Gary McAllister would score. He's a great striker of the ball and was our designated penalty taker.

But Seaman saves...

Gary McAllister opts for power with his spot-kick, but David Seaman has guessed the right way and flings out an elbow. The ball cannons to safety

Brown: I would have put my mortgage on him scoring. But Seaman went the right way and the ball was the perfect height for him. It was shown on TV the other night and Gary rang me afterwards. He said "I'm really sorry, if I scored that penalty we would have won". "Now you're telling me!" I said.

A Gazza goal 'beyond belief'

From the resulting corner, Scotland conceded a free-kick inside the England area and Seaman launches it into the Scotland half. As Sheringham controls and feeds Anderton on the left, Gascoigne is already sprinting past them. He lets Anderton's pass bounce before lifting it over Hendry with his left foot and volleying the dropping ball past Goram with his right

McCall: What a lot of people don't know was that, if the penalty went in, England had Gazza's number up to take him off.

Brown: Don Howe [England assistant manager] and Terry Venables were in discussion and it was Gazza's number they were getting ready. I looked at my colleague Alex Miller and said "thank goodness for that!"

McCall: A minute later, he does what only Gazza could do and scores a world-class goal. It's an iconic goal that can only be scored by a brilliant player.

Brown: That changed their substitution plans! It was a goal beyond belief.

McCall: It was a really disappointing end to a game where there was nothing in it. We had more than held our own, if the penalty went in then who is to say we wouldn't have gone on to win?

Who got Gazza's shirt again?

Rangers team-mates Ally McCoist and Paul Gascoigne swap shirts at the final whistle. Scotland would beat Switzerland in their final group game but miss out on the quarter-finals on goal difference. England eventually fell to Germany in the semi-finals, losing on penalties

McCall: After the game we were on the bus and Ally says "I got Gazza's shirt".

And I went "I can't believe you've done that, that goal's probably put us out of the tournament". The lads were telling me to calm down and I was trying to keep a straight face.

"Nah, it's a disgrace," I said. "I'd have never taken his shirt, especially after he scored against us."

"You're only jealous," he replied. "Jealous?! I've got nothing to be jealous about," I said, and dipped into my bag and I pulled out mine and said "that's a real Gazza shirt - that's the one he played in against us and didn't score - so I got the original!"


This news item was provided by the BBC Sport - Football website - the original link is: http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/52915690

Manchester City braced to face the biggest test of their Abu Dhabi era as FFP appeal case looms

The clock is ticking for Manchester City. The reigning Premier League champions have an appointment with destiny on Monday. The direction of the club will be determined over three days of hearings in front of the Court of Arbitration for Sport in Lausanne.

City are appealing against the two-year ban from the Champions League for breaching Uefa’s financial fair play (FFP) regulations. If the verdict of European football’s ruling body is upheld, City’s immediate future will be thrown into chaos.

The club – who vehemently deny any wrongdoing – would face the prospect of player departures and questions over Pep Guardiola’s continued presence at the Etihad. There would also be the prospect of an unseemly battle in the Swiss courts. Unless City are exonerated by CAS there are difficult days ahead.

The English club have taken a bullish approach to their showdown with Uefa. Money is no object to the Abu Dhabi-owned club – that is the root of the problem – and City have engaged numerous lawyers of the highest quality to fight the case against them. They have taken the same approach to the law as to managers and players: pay for the best to get the best chance of success.

The most high profile member of the legal team is David Pannick, QC, whose reputation was enhanced by two successful challenges to the government’s handling of the Brexit process. FFP is almost as divisive and intractable as the UK’s quest to leave the European Union. Next week’s case may end up as a mini allegory for Brexit with City out of Europe, suffering dire financial consequences and foreigners deserting the Etihad in droves.

The Court of Arbitration for Sport in Lausanne, Switzerland (Getty)

Uefa have involved legal big guns, too. They will deploy what a seasoned observer called “their A-team.” It has not always been that way in the ruling body’s dealings with CAS. More effort has seemed to go into the original, internal proceedings and appeals have sometimes seemed like an afterthought. On Monday only the sharpest minds will be on deck.

There is confidence in the organisation’s Nyon headquarters that the hearings will go their way but no one is prepared to discuss the details. In November City went to CAS contending that Uefa had wrongly assigned the case to the adjudicatory chamber, the committee that hands down the punishments. CAS dismissed the petition on procedural grounds but were sympathetic to club’s assertion that leaks to the media undermined the integrity of the disciplinary procedure.

That view, CAS said, was “not without merit.” Uefa will not make the same mistake again.

There has been a cloud over City’s spending since a website called Football Leaks revealed a cache of hacked emails that contained damaging allegedly internal communications that appeared to indicate that the club had flouted FFP rules. Uefa have insisted from the start that their evidence is not connected with the illegally-obtained Football Leaks material.

It will take CAS some time to reach their decision but City’s fate should become clear in a matter of weeks. Although the court schedule does not allow enough time for proper, forensic cross-examination of witnesses – a factor that may suit the club – the case will be treated with proper seriousness.

If City are adjudged to have broken the rules, it is possible that the ban will come at a good time. The Covid-19 crisis means that European competition may not even happen next season. A likelier scenario is a stripped down Champions League without the prestige and fiscal rewards that come with success in a conventional season. In those circumstances a two-year period of exile would not be as damaging. Every effort is being made to get domestic football back to normal but continental play with cross-border travel may prove more problematic.

A European ban would be very damaging for City (Getty)

There are many imponderables for football in the next few months but one thing is for certain. City’s appeal is a landmark case for the sport. Uefa’s authority is at stake and the direction of FFP in the future may well be defined in Lausanne.

City’s most crucial test since the Abu Dhabi takeover in 2008 will come in a courtroom rather than on the pitch. Stakes do not come higher.


This news item was provided by the The Independent - Premier League website - the original link is: https://www.independent.co.uk/sport/football/premier-league/manchester-city-ffp-appeal-cas-lawyers-champions-league-a9550271.html

England defender Tyrone Mings praises 'passion' of Black Lives Matter movement as he joins protest

The Independent employs over 100 journalists around the world to bring you news you can trust. Please consider a contribution or subscription.

Tyrone Mings has thrown his support behind the Black Lives Matter movement after joining a protest in Birmingham on Thursday.

The England and Aston Villa defender was among thousands at Victoria Square protesting against racial injustice following the death of George Floyd on 25 May in Minneapolis.

Mings joined the peaceful march after Floyd was killed after a white police officer, since charged with his murder, held him down to the ground by pressing a knee on his neck for eight minutes and 46 seconds.

The England centre-back wore a face mask throughout the event, which had the message ‘Won’t Be Silenced’ written across it.

Mings posted pictures of himself marching along with the message: “Nothing but energy and passion today. I make no apologies for standing up for what I believe in.”

Mings joined the Black Lives Matter protest (Twitter/OfficialTM_3)

West Midlands Police confirmed there were no incidents during the protest.

A statement read: “Around 4,000 people took part in a peaceful protest around Birmingham city centre today.

“The protesters were loud and passionate, and made their voices clearly heard. There were no arrests and no disorder.”

Mings is set to feature for Villa upon the return of the Premier League with the club’s game in hand against Sheffield United scheduled for 17 June.


This news item was provided by the The Independent - Premier League website - the original link is: https://www.independent.co.uk/sport/football/premier-league/tyrone-mings-black-lives-matter-protest-george-floyd-aston-villa-england-a9550211.html

England defender Tyrone Mings praises 'passion' of Black Lives Matter movement as he joins protest

The Independent employs over 100 journalists around the world to bring you news you can trust. Please consider a contribution or subscription.

Tyrone Mings has thrown his support behind the Black Lives Matter movement after joining a protest in Birmingham on Thursday.

The England and Aston Villa defender was among thousands at Victoria Square protesting against racial injustice following the death of George Floyd on 25 May in Minneapolis.

Mings joined the peaceful march after Floyd was killed after a white police officer, since charged with his murder, held him down to the ground by pressing a knee on his neck for eight minutes and 46 seconds.

The England centre-back wore a face mask throughout the event, which had the message ‘Won’t Be Silenced’ written across it.

Mings posted pictures of himself marching along with the message: “Nothing but energy and passion today. I make no apologies for standing up for what I believe in.”

Mings joined the Black Lives Matter protest (Twitter/OfficialTM_3)

West Midlands Police confirmed there were no incidents during the protest.

A statement read: “Around 4,000 people took part in a peaceful protest around Birmingham city centre today.

“The protesters were loud and passionate, and made their voices clearly heard. There were no arrests and no disorder.”

Mings is set to feature for Villa upon the return of the Premier League with the club’s game in hand against Sheffield United scheduled for 17 June.


This news item was provided by the The Independent - Premier League website - the original link is: https://www.independent.co.uk/sport/football/premier-league/tyrone-mings-black-lives-matter-protest-george-floyd-aston-villa-england-a9550211.html