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Premier League

PL, EFL tell fans: No quick answers on return

"Clubs and their supporters have a vital role to play in supporting the Government's guidance"

Last Updated: 01/04/20 12:14pm

Liverpool currently lead the Premier League by 25 points

Liverpool currently lead the Premier League by 25 points

The Premier League and EFL have told football fans there are no "quick answers" on how and when football will return after its suspension because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The Premier League, the EFL and Women's Super League and Championship have been suspended until April 30 "at the earliest".

The deadline for returning to action was extended indefinitely as part of an agreement with the FA.

A message to football supporters from the Premier League, the English Football League, the FA and Football Supporters' Association (FSA) says the situation is regularly changing.

The message said: "COVID-19 has presented a hugely challenging and uncertain time for everyone and our thoughts are with all those directly affected by the pandemic.

"We are all committed to getting back to playing the game we love - but only when it is safe to do so.

1:25 Chief reporter Bryan Swanson discusses what will be on the agenda as UEFA prepare to hold talks with every European association about the coronavirus.

Chief reporter Bryan Swanson discusses what will be on the agenda as UEFA prepare to hold talks with every European association about the coronavirus.

"Amid the current uncertainty, supporters will understandably have a number of questions relating to the season and the clubs they follow, and there are no quick answers to how and when we will return to what used to be our football normality.

"As the situation is regularly changing, the Premier League, EFL and The FA will continue to consult the FSA and keep supporters updated on the progress made as soon as is practically possible."

1:49 Deputy Chief Medical Officer Dr Jenny Harries explains how long the social distancing measures could be in place in the UK in Sunday's Government briefing in Downing Street.

Deputy Chief Medical Officer Dr Jenny Harries explains how long the social distancing measures could be in place in the UK in Sunday's Government briefing in Downing Street.

Fans have a vital role to play in coronavirus battle

The letter also called on fans to play their part in following government advice.

"The Football Supporters' Association, Premier League, EFL and The FA want to reiterate that clubs and their supporters have a vital role to play in supporting the Government's guidance and ensuring community strength and solidarity.

0:24 Tottenham manager Jose Mourinho has been helping out at Age Concern UK in Enfield during the coronavirus pandemic.

Tottenham manager Jose Mourinho has been helping out at Age Concern UK in Enfield during the coronavirus pandemic.

"While there is no football, our sport can still play its part. Clubs and supporters have responded magnificently with staff, fans and volunteers supporting those most in need in their local towns and cities.

"Many supporters' groups across the country have also shown just how valuable they are.

"We have seen official supporters' trusts raising tens of thousands of pounds in their local communities, donating to local foodbanks, delivering care packages and helping NHS staff.

"The work of clubs, staff, volunteers and fans is making a difference to those in need.

"The FSA, Premier League, EFL and The FA encourage all clubs and supporters' groups to remain in contact during this difficult time and, where possible, support one another in their community efforts.

"We also extend our gratitude to those football supporters who are key workers, and those who have offered their support on a volunteer basis.

"We urge fans across the country to follow the ongoing Government advice, to provide us all with the best opportunity to keep fans and communities safe."

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This news item was provided by the
SkySports | News website - the original link is: https://www.skysports.com/football/news/11688/11966747/premier-league-and-efl-tell-fans-there-are-no-quick-answers-on-return-to-football

Premier League players in ‘moral vacuum’ and should sacrifice salary – politicians

Tottenham, Newcastle and Norwich have all furloughed non-playing staff

Premier League footballers are living in a “moral vacuum” and should be the first to sacrifice salaries during the coronavirus pandemic, say politicians.

Julian Knight, the chair of the Department for Culture, Media and Sport committee, had condemned the actions of some Premier League clubs, who have furloughed non-playing staff.

Tottenham, Newcastle and Norwich have opted to utilise the government’s job retention scheme during the pandemic.

“It sticks in the throat,” said Knight.

“This exposes the crazy economics in English football and the moral vacuum at its centre.”

Mayor of London Sadiq Khan told BBC Radio 5 Live that top-flight players should be the ones to “carry the burden”.

“My view is always that those who are the least well off should get the most help,” he said.

“Highly paid football players are people who can carry the greatest burden and they should be the first one to, with respect, sacrifice their salary, rather than the person selling the programme or the person who does catering or the person who probably doesn’t get anywhere near the salary some of the Premier League footballers get.

“It should be those with the broadest shoulders who go first because they can carry the greatest burden and have probably got savings, rather than those who were in catering or hospitality who have probably got no savings and live week by week and who probably won’t get the [government] benefits for five weeks.”

A number of clubs have taken other steps to reduce their costs while football is suspended during the coronavirus pandemic.

Players at Championship leaders Leeds United have already volunteered to take a wage deferral while Birmingham City players who earn more than £6,000 a week have been asked to take a 50% cut for the next four months.

In Europe, Barcelona players have taken a 70% pay cut while Juventus players and manager Maurizio Sarri have agreed to freeze their pay for four months.

However, Lord Mervyn King, former governor of the Bank of England, says Tottenham's decision is fair, and Brighton & Hove Albion chief executive and deputy chairman Paul Barber says he can understand why clubs such as Tottenham would furlough staff.

Brighton have committed to playing all matchday staff until the end of the season but Barber says he cannot rule out having to make cuts.

“It’s a very difficult time for everybody and I can fully understand why people think that the football industry and particularly the Premier League has got a lot of cash,” he told BBC Radio 5 Live.

“In many cases that’s not the case, it’s a bit of a myth, but what we have to do is protect jobs.

“We’re doing whatever we can to do that and that’s the priority at the moment for just about every industry in the country, including ours.”

Premier League and English Football League clubs are set to discuss a collective wage deferral agreement at a meeting with the Professional Footballers’ Association on Wednesday.


This news item was provided by the BBC Sport - Football website - the original link is: http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/52120578

Premier League players in ‘moral vacuum’ and should sacrifice salary – politicians

Tottenham, Newcastle and Norwich have all furloughed non-playing staff

Premier League footballers are living in a “moral vacuum” and should be the first to sacrifice salaries during the coronavirus pandemic, say politicians.

Julian Knight, the chair of the Department for Culture, Media and Sport committee, had condemned the actions of some Premier League clubs, who have furloughed non-playing staff.

Tottenham, Newcastle and Norwich have opted to utilise the government’s job retention scheme during the pandemic.

“It sticks in the throat,” said Knight.

“This exposes the crazy economics in English football and the moral vacuum at its centre.”

Mayor of London Sadiq Khan told BBC Radio 5 Live that top-flight players should be the ones to “carry the burden”.

“My view is always that those who are the least well off should get the most help,” he said.

“Highly paid football players are people who can carry the greatest burden and they should be the first one to, with respect, sacrifice their salary, rather than the person selling the programme or the person who does catering or the person who probably doesn’t get anywhere near the salary some of the Premier League footballers get.

“It should be those with the broadest shoulders who go first because they can carry the greatest burden and have probably got savings, rather than those who were in catering or hospitality who have probably got no savings and live week by week and who probably won’t get the [government] benefits for five weeks.”

A number of clubs have taken other steps to reduce their costs while football is suspended during the coronavirus pandemic.

Players at Championship leaders Leeds United have already volunteered to take a wage deferral while Birmingham City players who earn more than £6,000 a week have been asked to take a 50% cut for the next four months.

In Europe, Barcelona players have taken a 70% pay cut while Juventus players and manager Maurizio Sarri have agreed to freeze their pay for four months.

However, Lord Mervyn King, former governor of the Bank of England, says Tottenham's decision is fair, and Brighton & Hove Albion chief executive and deputy chairman Paul Barber says he can understand why clubs such as Tottenham would furlough staff.

Brighton have committed to playing all matchday staff until the end of the season but Barber says he cannot rule out having to make cuts.

“It’s a very difficult time for everybody and I can fully understand why people think that the football industry and particularly the Premier League has got a lot of cash,” he told BBC Radio 5 Live.

“In many cases that’s not the case, it’s a bit of a myth, but what we have to do is protect jobs.

“We’re doing whatever we can to do that and that’s the priority at the moment for just about every industry in the country, including ours.”

Premier League and English Football League clubs are set to discuss a collective wage deferral agreement at a meeting with the Professional Footballers’ Association on Wednesday.


This news item was provided by the BBC Sport - Football website - the original link is: http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/52120578

PFA meeting PL, EFL over player wage deferrals

Club owners warn wage deferral scheme integral to surviving current crisis

Last Updated: 01/04/20 11:51am

The PFA will meet with both Premier League and EFL officials on Wednesday to discuss player wages and whether they can agree a deferral of salaries during the current crisis.

On the agenda will be the suggestion of a collective agreement to cover all players from the Premier League to League Two, however the issue is a complex one with the varying levels of salaries involved.

Newcastle, Norwich and Tottenham and a high number of EFL clubs have announced that many non-playing staff have been furloughed in order to take up the benefits of the government financial scheme to preserve jobs.

A number of club owners and chairmen are warning that a wage deferral is inevitable if clubs are to get through the current situation and survive the financial burden.

The world's leading players union, FIFPro, has called on clubs to stop firing players or cutting their salaries before talks.

FIFPro said it is "extremely concerned" that clubs in several countries "have begun to immediately lay off players or unilaterally reduce their salaries" because of the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

The Netherlands-based union said many players worldwide earn at or below average domestic income "and would be severely affected by salary decreases".

The first-team squads of several top European clubs including Barcelona and Juventus have agreed to take wage cuts.

5:01 Sky Sports' Alan McInally says the top earners in the Premier League can afford to take a pay cut to help their clubs deal with the financial impact of the coronavirus

Sky Sports' Alan McInally says the top earners in the Premier League can afford to take a pay cut to help their clubs deal with the financial impact of the coronavirus

The Premier League and EFL have told football fans there are no "quick answers" on how and when football will return after its suspension because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The Premier League, the EFL and Women's Super League and Championship have been suspended until April 30 "at the earliest".

The deadline for returning to action was extended indefinitely as part of an agreement with the FA.

Last month, the EFL put in place a £50m fund to help with the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on clubs.

The pinch is already being felt, with Birmingham asking some players to defer half their pay, while players at Leeds have volunteered for a wage deferral.

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This news item was provided by the
SkySports | News website - the original link is: https://www.skysports.com/football/news/11688/11966780/premier-league-and-efl-to-meet-pfa-in-hope-of-reaching-wage-deferral-agreement

West Ham's Michail Antonio to take social media break after announcing father's death

West Ham winger Michail Antonio has announced he will take a break from social media following the death of his father.

In an Instagram story on Tuesday, the 30-year-old revealed his father had died after spending much of the last decade in hospital.

“Over the last seven years my dad has been ill, in and out of hospital, and now his life has come to its end,” Antonio said.

“So I’ve been getting messages and I’ve been getting phone calls, and I just want to put this out and say: I’m not going to be responding to people much or be posting anything on Instagram until I feel like I’m ready to again.

“I want all of you to put my family in your prayers.”

Antonio did not suggest that his father had coronavirus symptoms.

In March, West Ham vice-president Karren Brady said the Premier League season should be voided amid the Covid-19 pandemic, but later appeared to change tack.

She also revealed that eight West Ham players had exhibited coronavirus symptoms.


This news item was provided by the The Independent - Premier League website - the original link is: https://www.independent.co.uk/sport/football/premier-league/west-ham-michail-antonio-father-dies-premier-league-a9439951.html